From Gallifrey with Love: The Time of the Doctor

“The Time of the Doctor” isn’t the action-packed romp that many seemed to expect for Matt Smith’s final outing.  Instead, it’s a story revolving around growing up, taking responsibility, and the inevitability of change that unfolds at a rather leisurely pace.  Yet somehow the story manages to weave action sequences, comedic scenes, and touching moments together in a way that, while not perfect, was exactly the right kind of send-off for Matt Smith’s eleventh (I’m stubbornly not renumbering him the thirteenth) Doctor.

The Doctor encounters a Monoid

The Doctor encounters a Monoid

A mysterious signal that is being broadcast throughout the universe draws the Doctor and his companion Handles, a Cyberman head, to an unknown planet.  He joins the many other ships from around the universe that have surrounded the planet, but cannot land because the planet has been shielded by the Church of the Papal Mainframe, who were the first to arrive.

He and Clara (who was having Christmas dinner with her family before joining the Doctor on the TARDIS) are soon welcomed by Tasha Lem, the Mother Superior of the Papal Mainframe who sends them down to the origin of the signal, slipping them past the shields.  Once in Christmas, the town from which the signal originates, the Doctor encounters the crack in the universe, last seen in the fifth series.

He soon discovers that the message is from Gallifrey, which he did manage to save in “The Day of the Doctor.” The Time Lords are trying to find a way back into this universe, and the message is asking the first question, “Doctor who?”  He also learns that the unknown planet is Trenzalore, the place where the “eleventh will fall.”  If he answers the question, they will know that it is really him, and that it is safe for them to come through the crack.  The Church does not want this to happen because if the Time Lords return, the Time War will begin anew; the Daleks are already prepared to attack.  Tasha Lem dedicates the church to ensuring that the Doctor remains silent so that the peace can be preserved.  However, now that the Doctor has decoded the message and everyone knows what it says, he cannot leave the town.  If he does,  the town will be destroyed to prevent the return of the Time Lords.  The eleventh Doctor is finally forced to take the long way and stay put in one place, which he does for hundreds of years, protecting the inhabitants of Christmas from a slew of would be invaders including Weeping Angels, Sontarans, Cybermen, and, of course, Daleks.

The Doctor accompanied by his former enemies, the Silence.

The Doctor accompanied by his former enemies, the Silence.

One of the hallmarks of the eleventh Doctor has been his impatience and need to keep moving; he doesn’t like to stay in one place too long.   Remember his reaction when he had to stay with Amy and Rory for a short time during “The Power of Three?”  I also can’t help but think of his shock at Rory being willing to protect the Pandorica with Amy inside for almost 2000 years, when he could just jump ahead and meet the Pandorica at the end of its journey.   The eleventh Doctor never wanted to take the long way.  After all that time spent on the run, I hoped that the eleventh Doctor’s finale would allow him to finally stop running and take responsibility for something, which is exactly what happened.  After the events of “The Day of the Doctor,” the eleventh Doctor no longer needed to escape his past.  His burden of guilt was lifted, and he was  ready to grow up.  It was time for him to stop running and he finally did, staying with the people of Christmas for many hundreds of years.

While I generally remain a fan of Steven Moffat’s writing, I have had one major issue with his tenure as show runner: the inordinate number of loose ends he left at the conclusion of each of his major story arcs.  I knew he’d said that he would address those loose ends in this story, but I remained a bit skeptical.  However, I have to admit that he did a surprisingly good job tying up most of the loose ends.  “The Time of the Doctor” explains the exploding TARDIS, the crack in time, what was in the Doctor’s room in “The God Complex (the crack in the universe), who the Silence are, and why they were trying to kill the Doctor.  The idea that the Silence were genetically modified priests actually helps eliminate one of the problems I had with them: they didn’t seem like they were a society like some of the other alien species do.  I find that many of Moffat’s creations, while scary, just don’t feel like they are an actual species; they seem more like monsters whose only purpose is to scare people.  The idea that the Silence aren’t a natural species helps eliminate this issue for me.  The explanations for all of these loose ends made the episode a bit exposition heavy, but overall, I felt that Moffat pulled it off.

Which leads me to another general complaint that many people have about Moffat’s writing: how he writes his female characters.  I’m not going to weigh in too much about my feelings on that topic here (that will eventually be a post of its own), but this story did emphasize one of the criticisms I have of Moffat’s women.  I don’t understand why just about every female character ends up with a similar personality and has to have a flirty relationship with the Doctor. This definitely applies to the character of Tasha Lem.  Overall, I enjoyed her character, and would consider her an asset to the story, but why did her and the Doctor’s first meeting have to be filled with flirtation and the discussion had to take place over an altar that looks like a bed? All of Moffat’s women are clever, but they speak in the same flirty way which makes them almost indistinguishable from each other.  This leads to people thinking that Tasha is somehow a version of River Song.  Yes, that is an actual theory that I’ve heard/seen discussed, largely because Tasha banters with the Doctor in much the same way as River.

The Doctor and Tasha discuss the mysterious signal (in a flirtatious way, of course).

The Doctor and Tasha discuss the mysterious signal (in a flirtatious way, of course).

The another weak point of the story were the scenes with Clara’s family.   It felt as if they were there to shoehorn Christmas into the Christmas special.  They’ve never been shown before, and I didn’t feel like we were given much of a chance to know anything about them.  I’m not even sure exactly who the one woman was! There was that nice moment between Clara and her gran, but overall, it felt as if the time with them was taking us away from the main story.

The one other criticism I have of this story has to do with Matt Smith’s performance.  I loved most of it, but there was one area in which I thought he fell a bit short.  I just didn’t find him convincing as an old man.  He is great at showing the age of the Doctor as a weight that he carries, and I have always said that Matt Smith’s Doctor always seemed the oldest to me.  However, he was not the best at physically conveying his Doctor as an old man. He was about as convincing to me as Joseph Cotton is in Citizen Kane. He feels like a younger man pretending to be old.

With all these criticisms, you might think that I didn’t care for the episode, but it worked for me despite the flaws.  First, I loved that Steven Moffat peppered the entire episode with references to the past.  There were so many references to previous new Who episodes that I won’t even begin to list them here.  What I enjoyed even more were spotting the references to classic Who, of which there were quite a few. There was the seal from “The Five Doctors,” the mention of Terileptils, first seen in the “The Visitation,” the Monoid puppet, the nose tap like the fourth Doctor, and the “reversing the polarity” reference.  The references even occurred in the Doctor’s appearance.  The old Doctor’s hairstyle and walking stick reminded me of the first Doctor.  He even dons a black cloak/cape with a purple lining in an early scene, reminiscent of John Pertwee’s attire.  I thought there might be a reference or two to the second Doctor, since he was clearly the biggest influence on Matt Smith’s Doctor, but I didn’t catch any.

The Doctor in his Pertwee-esque cloak

The Doctor in his Pertwee-esque cloak

Finally, what really made the episode for me was the regeneration scene.  As I stated earlier, I felt that it was time for the eleventh Doctor to stop running and grow up a bit, and he did.  This time, unlike in season six, he did not run away from his death (which we now know he thought would be his actual death, not just another regeneration), but faced it with dignity.  Unlike the tenth Doctor (who I thought got too whiny and felt too sorry for himself), the eleventh Doctor accepted that he would eventually die, but tried to make the most of his death.  After the Time Lords send him the new cycle of regenerations, he becomes gleeful and completely accepts the fact that he is going to regenerate.  He doesn’t worry about it being too painful and mope about how his current persona will die.

His regeneration scene is a great one.  I thought his final moments, in which he talked about the inevitability of change and the importance of remembering, were quite touching.  It was also incredibly appropriate that after taking about how we all are different people, he sees the two versions of Amy Pond that he knew.  Certainly the young Amelia and the grown up Amy Pond prove his point that everybody is different people at different points in their lives. And I have to admit that I did get a bit teary eyed when Amy said goodnight to her “Raggedy Man.”  How appropriate that the first face that this Doctor saw would come back to him at the end.

The Doctor shares his final moments with Amy

The Doctor shares his final moments with Amy

Then, in a perfect gesture, the iconic bow tie drops to the floor as the twelfth Doctor appears.  There’s not much to say about Peter Capaldi’s Doctor at the moment, except that I’m really looking forward to seeing what he does in the upcoming season.

The twelfth Doctor

The twelfth Doctor

“The Time of the Doctor” is a fitting farewell to Matt Smith’s Doctor.  It’s also an appropriate farewell for the fiftieth anniversary year.  In the eleventh Doctor’s final monologue, he is essentially discussing what lies at the heart of the show.  Doctor Who is a show about change. To love the show, you have to accept change. No matter how popular or beloved a Doctor is, he will, eventually, be gone.  However, Matt Smith will always be the Doctor, just as William Hartnell and all who came between will always be the Doctor as well.  Just because a new person has taken on the role, it does not diminish the time of the others in the role. They are all a part of the show now, even as it continues to evolve and move forward.  Everything and everyone changes; life keeps moving forward, but the important thing is to remember what came before.  If that’s not the perfect sentiment for a show celebrating its fiftieth year, than I don’t know what is.

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Chicago TARDIS 2013

This year’s Chicago TARDIS was a particularly memorable one for me. I always look forward to Chicago TARDIS for the panels, the friends, and the cosplaying, but this year I was looking forward to something even more exciting…but I’m getting ahead of myself here, so I’ll start with a quick run through of the convention itself.

One of my favorite moments: Colin Baker meeting a young fan.

One of my favorite moments: Colin Baker meeting a young fan.

This year’s convention was larger than ever before; the number of attendees just about doubled from last year.  There were a few wrinkles (waiting for almost an hour and a half to get my badge on Friday was a bit much), but overall things went pretty smoothly considering the drastic increase in people.

There was a lineup of guests that was appropriate for a fiftieth anniversary convention.  There were three Doctors (Peter Davison, Colin Baker, and Paul McGann) and a companion from every decade (Frazer Hines, Louise Jameson, Nicola Bryant, Daphne Ashbrook, and Freema Agyeman), plus a wide assortment of supporting characters, behind the scenes people, and Big Finish audio people.  I have to say that I enjoyed every panel that I attended.

I had already seen many of the guests at previous conventions, but it was my first time seeing Colin Baker, Paul McGann, and Louise Jameson, so I was looking forward to their panels. Paul McGann was entertaining, even if he did seem a bit jet-lagged.  The beginning of the panel felt like it should have been called “Free Association…with Paul McGann” as we learned things like he had taken ballroom dancing as a child, but there was never a dull moment.  I really felt that I learned a quite a bit from Colin Baker’s panel.  Being a huge Jane Austen fan, I found it very interesting that he compared his Doctor to Mr. Darcy.  His plan was to be a bit unlikable in the beginning, but to gradually peel back layers to reveal more depth to the character.  Unfortunately, he wasn’t really given enough time to develop his Doctor and show his softer side, leaving the viewers instead with a rather abrasive Doctor.

This is a picture I took of Frazer Hines at Gally last year, but I didn't take many pictures at Chicago TARDIS this year, so it'll have to do.

This is a picture I took of Frazer Hines at Gally last year, but I didn’t take many pictures at Chicago TARDIS this year, so it’ll have to do.

I also felt that the panel with Frazer Hines was a highlight, even though I had just seen him at Gally.  He seems to thoroughly enjoy his time on stage at conventions and has countless stories about his time on the set (and his time working with Charlie Chaplin). He has a great deal of affection for Patrick Troughton, so I love hearing him talk about him.  Dan Starkey is also always a great storyteller, so I quite enjoyed his panel as well.  I had to miss most of Peter Davison’s solo panel, which was a bit disappointing, but what I missed it for more than made up for it (see how I’m building the suspense here?).  I was also hoping to catch his director’s commentary on “The Five-ish Doctors” (and if I wasn’t already so behind on my blog I would have written an entry about how great his anniversary tribute was), but I wasn’t able to make it to that either.

Personally, I quite enjoyed the weekend as well.  I enjoy cosplaying and this year’s Chicago TARDIS gave me the opportunity to try out my first handmade costume.  At pervious events I’ve cosplayed Amy, since all I really needed to do was to take clothes from my closet (I’m not sure what that says about me) and buy a red wig.  This year, I decided to try to master Polly’s Atlantian outfit from “The Underwater Menace.”  Yes, that’s right, I decided to dress as a character that many people don’t really know, from a story that has only partially survived.  I just love the over-the-top aesthetic in that story (what do you expect from someone who owns the works of Ed Wood?) and I wanted to pay tribute to it.  Therefore, I had quite a few people who came up to me asking who on earth I was dressed as, but, much to my surprise, I had several people who instantly knew who I was.  It’s still not completely finished (I’m hoping to get it finished before Gally), and it’s nowhere near as accurate and well-made as the outfits many other cosplayers create, but I was proud of it.  If you want to see examples of the cosplay, here is a link to the tumblr of Chicago TARDIS (and you can see me as Polly if you click on set 2 of the Friday costuming links).

The highlight of the weekend, however, was the fact that, thanks to my involvement with a podcast, I was able to interview Peter Davison, Louise Jameson, Terry Molloy, and Michael Jayston.  I learned about the interviews only a few days before they were to occur, so I had to abandon my blog post about the 50th and, instead, focus on preparing for my interviews. They were all incredibly nice, despite the fact that they probably get asked the same questions over and over, and I had a great time talking with all of them. It was also kind of cool that to get to the interviewing room, you had to walk through the lounge for the guests.  It really made you feel like you were behind the scenes when you see the guests just hanging around, eating or chatting with other guests.

Since I didn't get to take any photos during the interviews here's Michael Jayston and Terry Molloy, borrowed from Terry Molloy's twitter feed.

Since I didn’t get to take any photos during the interviews, here’s Michael Jayston and Terry Molloy, borrowed from Terry Molloy’s twitter feed.

I interviewed Peter Davison and Louise Jameson with someone else, so I didn’t get to ask them everything that I would’ve liked to ask.  My fellow interviewer was a huge Peter Davison fan, so he had a lot that he wanted to say to him.  However, it was really amazing to sit down with him and listen to him talk about everything from his time on the show to his creation of “The Five-ish Doctors.”  He was just as funny and charming as he seems and was able to supply an interesting opinion or funny anecdote no matter what question he was asked.

I was able to take a little more control in the Louise Jameson interview, which was great because I wanted to get her perspective on the character of Leela (who is one of the strongest and most unusual companions).  As you know, if you’ve been reading this blog, I’m very interested in the role of women in the show, so it was great to meet with Louise Jameson and discuss her experiences and how she felt about her character.  It was refreshing to learn that she didn’t feel that Leela had a good exit either and thinks that she would’ve left Andred long ago.

The interviews with Terry Molloy and Michael Jayston, however, were completely mine, so I enjoyed them a bit more.  I was a bit nervous going into them, but they turned out to be tremendous fun.  Terry Molloy was a delight to interview.  He was very funny and easygoing, and it was impossible to feel nervous interviewing him.  His knowledge about the character of Davros is incredible.  To play Davros (and he is the only person to play Davros in more than one story, plus he’s played him on the stage and in the Big Finish audios), he had to try to understand the character.  Obviously Davros doesn’t consider himself evil, so Mr. Molloy had to figure out how Davros sees himself.  Listening to him discuss Davros gave me a new appreciation of the character (and made me want to listen to his Big Finish audios).  When the interview was over, we both had to wait for a bit and he sat and chatted with me for about 10-15  more minutes.

My final interview was with Michael Jayston.  I’m actually a fan of his work outside of Doctor Who as well, so I found it amazing that I was able to sit down with him at all.  I mean, I was sitting next to a man who has worked with just about every well-known British actor who was around in the 70’s (plus many non-British actors as well)! I had already spoken to him twice at the convention because I kept running into him (he was often outside smoking, so I saw him out in front of the hotel almost every time I entered or left the building), but that was just in passing.  He has so many incredible stories about working with people like Laurence Olivier and Alec Guinness.  Additionally, he has stories about his friendship with Tom Baker, told me a story that I loved about working with Patrick Troughton, and has a lot to say about his time as the Doctor (yes, he makes it clear that the Valeyard is the Doctor).  We talked about his Mr. Rochester being selected as the best of all time (I’d have to agree),  Nicholas and Alexandra, and Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.  I also surprised him by asking him about The Public Eye, a film that isn’t well-remembered, but I couldn’t simply skip over the fact that he worked with Carol Reed (The Third Man is one of my all time favorite films).  The best time, however, came after the interview was over.  Neither one of us had anywhere to go, so he sat with me and we talked some more.  He told me some stories that were well…off-the-record and very entertaining.  He also had noticed that I was using a copy of Persuasion as a way to prop up the mike (it was the only thing I had on me that I could use), which lead to us discussing Jane Austen.  Finally, I began to worry that I was taking up too much of his time, so I told him I should be going and he kissed my hand (!) and walked me out while telling me how much he had enjoyed the interview.

And, to complete the random assortment of photos, here's a picture of the Dalek cupcakes I made right before Christmas.  They have nothing to do with Chicago TARDIS, but I was very happy with how they turned out.

And, to complete the random assortment of photos, here’s a picture of the Dalek cupcakes I made right before Christmas. They have nothing to do with Chicago TARDIS, but I was very happy with how they turned out.

Overall, this Chicago TARDIS was a memorable one.  I never thought that I’d be in a position to actually interview people from the show. I’m actually quite glad that they were recorded or else I might find it hard to believe that they actually happened!  Even without the interviews, though, I enjoyed Chicago TARDIS.  I’m already looking forward to Gallifrey One and to next year’s Chicago TARDIS, even though it will be difficult for either one to top my experience this year.

Gallifrey Falls No More: The Day of the Doctor

Somehow it’s been 2 months since my last post.  Part of my problem was my complete inability to write about “The Day of the Doctor” in an analytical way.  I saw it in the theatre (in 3D), which was a great way to experience it.  There was just so much excitement in the air, and it was impressive to see that there were 6 theaters(!) full of Doctor Who fans.  Even now, I still just have to say that I loved it, even though I know it has its flaws.  So, in an attempt to finally get this blog up to date, I’m just going to post the thoughts that I had after viewing the episode. I started this post right after the 50th aired, but something (which I’ll cover in my next post), got in the way of me finishing it.

All 12 of the Doctor's incarnations

All 12 of the Doctor’s incarnations

I’m going to begin by discussion what I liked best about the special: the way that it really did pay tribute to the entire history of the show.  My favorite moment was when all 13 Doctors appeared to save Gallifrey.  I have to admit that I got a little teary-eyed when they started showing images of all the precious incarnations of the Doctor.  I thought it was a nice way to honor all the actors who have played the Doctor, even if I did still wish that there had been a way to let the previous Doctors film something new for the special.  Which, of course, leads me to another favorite moment: Tom Baker’s appearance as the curator.  Since he probably is the most iconic of the Doctors, it seemed appropriate for him to turn up in this story.  This is one of those cases of emotion trumping logic because the explanation of his appearance is rather vague and I’m not sure it even makes sense, but I don’t care.  I was just happy to see him.

I also felt that Moffat did a great job of weaving subtle references to the past throughout the story.  The moment that I particularly enjoyed was when the War Doctor stated to regenerate and he mentioned that his body was “wearing thin,” just as Hartnell’s Doctor did in the first regeneration.  Of course there were also references to “reversing the polarity” and, of course, new series references, such as an explanation as to why Elizabeth was so mad at the Doctor in “The Shakespeare Code.” If I may have a tiny digression here, I was a bit disappointed at the way Moffat wrote Elizabeth.  I thought he made a woman who was very strong into a bit of a lovesick schoolgirl.  Does everyone really have to fall in love with the Doctor?

The Doctor and the Curator

The Doctor and the Curator

Moving on to the actual story, I thought that it was a clever way to save Gallifrey and take away the Doctor’s burden of guilt without negating the past.  I have always hoped that they would bring the Time Lords back to Doctor Who at some point.  After all, if the Daleks could survive their apparent destruction in the Time War, why couldn’t the Time Lords?  This story leaves that door open, but in a way that doesn’t change what we thought we knew.  The Doctor’s guilt has been an important part of his character since the new series began; if you just rewrite history and save Gallifrey, Eccleston’s brooding nature, the darkness in Tennant, and Smith’s constant running don’t make sense anymore.  Moffat managed to find a way to erase the weight of genocide from the Doctor’s past without trivializing how much he suffered from his guilt. I also enjoyed the way that Moffat used the Doctor’s guilt to explain why his most recent incarnations had gotten so young.  And, by lifting the burden of guilt from Matt Smith’s Doctor, he could now prepare the way for Peter Capaldi’s Doctor.

I also enjoyed the “War Doctor.”  The minisode that showed McGann’s Doctor regenerating into the “warrior” really set the stage for him.  I’ll admit to being a bit skeptical about whether or not I’d be able to accept the War Doctor, but I had absolutely no difficulties.  The casting of John Hurt certainly didn’t hurt in that respect.  Hurt was able to bring a lot to the character that really made you feel that this was a man who had lived though impossible times and was desperately searching for a way to make them stop.  I wish that Eccleston had been in the story (and I got a bit hopeful with the regeneration scene), but the story worked just fine without him.

The War Doctor and the Moment

The War Doctor and the Moment

I also thought that the way that Billie Piper returned was handled well, by not actually bringing Rose back, but having the Moment take on her form.  I was a bit wary of yet another appearance by Rose from her alternate universe or having to deal with the romance between Rose and Tennant’s Doctor again (of which I was not a huge fan), but Moffat managed to bring her back in a way the circumvented all of the possible hazards.  And, speaking of the Moment, I thought that it was a very clever device to use in the story: a weapon with a consciousness.  It seemed very Time Lord-esque to develop a weapon that could judge your actions and hold you accountable for them.

Finally, I should mention the villains.  I enjoyed the return of the Zygons.  Their storyline just kind of fizzled out at the end, but they proved that they could still be interesting villains.  I also thought it fitting that the Daleks made an important appearance, but I was glad that the story didn’t revolve around them.  The Daleks are very important to the history of the series, just as the Time War has become an important part of the new series. I liked that they were a part of the story, without being the central antagonists.

The Three Doctors

The Three Doctors

Overall, I thought “The Day of the Doctor” had a very Three Doctor-y vibe. Smith and Tennant get along better than Pertwee and Troughton’s Doctors did, but still there is a bit of that competitiveness that always came in the classic series whenever the Doctor met himself.  I loved the way the Doctors called each other on all of the criticisms that people have had of them (i.e. “timey-whimey,” the pointing of the sonics as if they’re weapons…)  Basically, I felt that “The Day of the Doctor” was a great tribute to all fifty years of the show while still moving the story forward and providing new storylines for the next 50 years.